They Don’t Make Them Like That Anymore!

This post doesn’t really follow my usual formula of easy science and student lifestyle, but bear with me.

My home was built around 1924 (not too sure of the year) and was bought by my great grandparents, my grandfather was born and raised there, my grandmother joined him and her new father and mother-in-law there after their marriage and their eldest child (my uncle Robbie) spent his very early life there.

My father, the youngest of my grandparents three kids, bought the house from his grandfather (my great grandfather) in the early 1980’s (when a house could actually be bought by a 20-something without too much of a hassle) and has lived there ever since. It’s the home that I grew up in, and for the first 16 years of my life, I had the same bedroom that my grandfather grew up in. It’s fair to say that this house is known as ‘the family home’, as four generations have called it home and it’s been owned by a Beane for just shy of 90 years.

We even have the same furniture from the twenties, my great grandparents ran a furniture company, and it’s all very well made. The collection included a grand old sideboard, dining table and chairs (slightly chewed by the dog when she was a puppy), a wardrobe and some chests of drawers.

What we also had, living in the loft, was my great grandmothers Singer sewing machine, which we fished down for my aunt to use as her sewing machine was in for repairs, the box hadn’t been opened for over 30 years and we were curious about it.

So this heavy wooden box was carefully taken down from the loft of the house, bought into the kitchen and placed on the exact same dining table that it had originally worked on, where it instantly worked! It still had thread attached on the top, and we spent the next hour gently sewing up a random tea towel, the only adjustment being a slight tightening of the stitches. I ask you, can you get sewing as easily as that with a modern machine (even one that’s already threaded), and…if you were to go out and buy a brand new standard sewing machine, would you expect it to work 90 years on being used by your great granddaughter?

I think not, so while I may sound old at my grand age of 20, I will say this…they don’t make them like that anymore!

It needs no electricity, apart from your own arm power and will fulfil all your basic sewing needs, because really, are you going to use all of the fancy electronic sewing patterns that are programmed into a modern day machine?

But enough of my rambling, just enjoy the pictures of this wonderful machine.

P1010152

P1010154

P1010153

P1010121

P1010130

P1010132

P1010134

P1010125

P1010144

P1010137

P1010140

P1010129

P1010150

P1010127

P1010147

P1010131

P1010149

P1010148

P1010128

Advertisements

4 Comments

  1. I love the fact that nearly a century of your family, a good man generations have lived in the same house, It makes you wish buildings could talk.

  2. You are so lucky to have one of these beautiful machines in your family! In Manchester there is a clothes shop and it’s entire window display on both sides of the shop consist of row upon row of this Singer sowing machine. I don’t know if they are reproduction or not. Best window display – ever!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s